Monthly Archive agosto 2013

ESA Conference: Austerity Protests in Comparison

En el decimoprimero Congreso de la Asociación Europea de Sociología que se tendrá en la Universidad de Turin, en el Research Network 25 – Social Movements, Compoliticas estará presente con el investigador asociado Tommaso Gravante en el panel a06RN25 – Austerity Protests in Comparison.

Programa del panel: b06RN25 – Austerity Protests in Comparison 

30/8/2013 – 16:00 – 17:30 – Palazzina Einaudi, Aula 4

Chair: Nicole Doerr (Mount Holyoke)

– Protest, Space and the Emergence of a New Political Culture in Greece.
Marilena Simiti, University of Piraeus, Athens

– Resistance to Austerity in Spanish State: Trajectory, Outcomes and Future of M15 Movement.
Josep Maria Antentas, Autonomous University of Barcelona

– Contemporary Citizens´ Protests: A Manifestation of the Transition of Radical Societal Critique into the Middle of Society.
Claudia Dorothea Schuetz, Leopold-Franzens University, Innsbruck

– From Indignation to Emancipation. A Propose of Analysis of the Indignados’ Movement from Below.
Tommaso Gravante, Compoliticas, Seville
Alice Poma, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville
Marco Baudone, University of Florence

– Social Innovation in Housing Policy in Spain.
Liviu Catalin Mara, University of Barcelona

More Information

ESA Conference: Social Movements and Emotion

En el decimoprimero Congreso de la Asociación Europea de Sociología  que se tendrá en la Universidad de Turin, en el Research Network 25 – Social Movements, Compoliticas estará presente con el investigador asociado Tommaso Gravante en el panel a06RN25 – Social Movements and Emotion Session.

Programa del panel
a06RN25 – Social Movements and Emotion Session One

30/8/ 2013 – 16:00 – 17:30 – Palazzina Einaudi, Aula 3

Chair: Helena Flam (University of Leipzig).

 The Emotional Dynamics of a Local Environmental Protest against the Sitting of Waste Management Facility: The Case of Keratea.
Angelos Evangelinidis, Postgraduate Student.

– How Emotions Change Protest. A Proposal of Analysis. 
Alice Poma, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville
Tommaso Gravante, Compoliticas, Spain

 Emotional Constellations of Demonstrators; The Impact of Political Allies.
Dunya MM van Troost, Free University, Amsterdam
Jacquelien van Stekelenburg, VU University, Amsterdam
Bert Klandermans, VU University, Amsterdam

– Fear Management Mechanisms in Protests agains Repressive Regimes.
Hank Johnston, San Diego State University.

More information

CfP: Videoactivism, culture and participation. Theory and practice of social change in the age of the networks. Deadline 27/01/2014.

Videoactivism, culture and participation. Theory and practice of social change in the age of the networks is the title of the proposal for an edited volume with publishing house Gedisa within its series “Comunicación/Comunicología Latina”.
Contributions to this volume will be co-ordinated by Dr. Francisco Sierra Caballero and Dr. David Montero Sánchez, both from the University of Seville.

Description

From different academic positions in the field of new technologies of information and communications (NTIC) it has become a commonplace to speak of the unstoppable emergence of audiovisual content on the net. The figures and forecasts are downright impressive: video downloads reached 20m. terabytes in 2012, which means an increase of over 50% in relation to 2010. It is estimated that, by 2016, 1.2m minutes of video will cross the net every second of the year.1 Also improvements in connectivity on mobile phones already highlight the fact that on-line video will be the fastest growing application at a rate of 75% between 2012 and 2017..2 Further to this, the availability of free editing software, constant bandwidth increases and access to on-line repositories have enriched audiovisual contributions on the net, adding to the phenomenon key social, cultural and political dimensions.

In spite of this, academic analyses devoted to on-line video are scarce and critical approaches virtually non-existent. Techno-economical research has become the norm: market studies, new business models, pros and cons of audiovisual marketing, assessments of the network’s ability to deal with the increasing demands of audiovisual contents, etc. On the other hand, aspects such as on-line video contribution to higher education, its value in relation to political activism or the ways in which it could enliven debates around citizenship still appear blurred and in need of rigorous academic attention.

On the one hand, it     has been pointed out that forms of social interaction and reproduction which characterize sites such as YouTube represent a clear example of participatory culture (Burgess y Green, 2009) as they allow for the articulation of communities around creative practices and interests fully integrated in each of their members lifeworlds. Regarding their political potential, these platforms would appear as spaces where new ways of performing citizenship become visible (Van Zoonen, Vis and Mihelj, 2010), with a significant role to play in political campaigning (Thorson, Ekdale, Borah, Namkoong and Shah, 2010)  and social protest (for instance as a counter-surveilance strategy in cases of police brutality (Wilson and Serisier, 2010).

Other voices have emphasized the need to frame the sort of participatory culture associated with on-line video in relation to the complex power dynamics which structure the main video-sharing websites. Here, attention is paid to the increasing commercialization of video platforms (Kim, 2012) and the exploitation of user-generated content for financial gain (Andrejevic, 2009). Participatory values and political activism emerge as unintended consequences rather than conscious aims, which underlines the importance of conceiving participation in these platforms from a clear logic of social appropriation (Sierra, 2013)

Nonetheless, these insights pose more questions than they answer. Is participation through on-line video limited to the embodiment of a more participatory conception of culture or does it have a direct impact on the public sphere? Which new forms of sociability do on-line video platforms generate? How is the conflict between commercial interests and citizen participation articulated within them? Which is the actual transforming power of participatory  video practices? Which patterns of social appropriation can be observed? Is on-line video transforming traditional forms of protest and political activism in itself? Can it subvert the role played by citizens in relation to all-powerful TV corporations? Does it have any influence in the political articulation of daily life?

The present volume aims sketch the theoretical set up which would allow a sound critical debate over the impact on-line video is having in contemporary societies, placing creative experiences among the different ways of citizenship building and community development promoted by the use of NTIC. Following this, contributions which approach on-line video, in general, and videoactivism on the Internet in particular, from a critical standpoint are specially welcome.

We seek critical contributions around issues such as:

•    Netactivism and use of on-line video by social movements
•    Digital literacy and audiovisual language
•    On-line video, surveillance and control
•    Socially transforming experiences based on the use of on-line video
•    YouTube and political economy
•    Corporative culture in on-line video platforms: censorship, commercial strategies, etc.
•    Political satire, propaganda and virality on the Internet (video memes)
•    Impact of on-line video practice within the public sphere
•    Visibility of minorities
•    Copyright, Copyleft and Creative Commons
•    First-person narratives on video, lifeworlds and new subjectivities (vlogs)
•    Digital video and human rights (witness.org)
•    Participatory experiences based on audiovisual technology
•    Co-creation and collective intelligence vs. commercial exploitation of user-generated content

Interested authors can send their proposals (400-500 words) and a complete CV to the following e mail address:fsierra@us.es

Deadline for proposals is 27/01/2014

The deadline for complete articles will be negotiated directly with selected contributors.

Contact

Dr. Francisco Sierra Caballero
Professor of Communication Studies / Interdisciplinary Research Group on Communication, Politics and Social Change (COMPOLITICAS)
Facultad de Comunicación (Universidad de Sevilla)
Avda. Américo Vespucio S/N (41092)
Sevilla / Spain
fsierra@us.es
Tel. +34 954559683

References

ANDREJEVIC, M. (2009) “Exploiting YouTube: Contradictions of User-Generated Labor” in Snickars, P. and Vonderau P. (eds) The YouTube Reader. National Library of Sweden: Stockholm.

BURGESS, Jean and GREEN, Joshua (2009). Youtube. On-line Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Politi Press.

KIM, J. (2012). “The institutionalization of YouTube: From user generated content to professionally generated content”. Media Culture Society. Vol. 34. N. 1

SIERRA, F. (2013) Ciudadanía, Tecnología y Cultura. Nodos conceptuales para pensar la nueva mediación digital. Gedisa: Barcelona.

THORSONA, Kjerstin; EKDALEA, Brian; BORAHA, Porismita; NAMKOONG, Kang and SHAH Chirag (2010), “YouTube and Proposition 8. A case study in video activism” in Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 13, N. 3

VAN ZOONEN, Liesbet; VIS, Farida and MIHELJ, Sabrina (2010). “Performing citizenship on YouTube: activism, satire and on-line debate around the anti-Islam video Fitna”

WILSON, Dean and SERISIER, Tanya (2010), “Video Activism and the ambiguities of counter-surveillance” in Surveillance & Society, Vol. 8, N. 2

CfP: Videoactivismo, cultura y participación .Teoría y praxis del cambio social en la era de las redes. Deadline 27/01/2014.

Videoactivismo, cultura y participación. Teoría y praxis del cambio social en la era de las redes es el título de una propuesta para la realización de un volumen editado por Gedisa dentro de su serie “Comunicación / Comunicología Latina”.
El volumen estará coordinado por el Dr. Francisco Sierra Caballero y por el Dr. David Montero Sánchez, ambos de la Universidad de Sevilla.

Descripción

Desde diferentes sectores académicos relacionados con las nuevas tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación (NTIC), se ha convertido prácticamente en un tópico hablar de la imparable emergencia de los contenidos audiovisuales en la red. Las cifras y proyecciones estadísticas son, bien es cierto, incontestables: las descargas de vídeo alcanzaron los 20 millones de terabytes en 2012, con un crecimiento de más del 50% respecto a 2010; se estima que, en 2016, 1,2 millones de minutos de vídeo circularán por la red cada segundo del año.1 Igualmente, las mejoras de conectividad en los terminales móviles indican que el vídeo en línea será la aplicación de mayor crecimiento en este terreno, a un ritmo del 75% entre 2012 y 2017.2 A todo esto hay que sumar que la disponibilidad de software de edición gratuito, el aumento del ancho de banda y el acceso a múltiples repositorios digitales han enriquecido las posibilidades de los formatos audiovisuales en Internet, añadiendo al fenómeno una dimensión social, cultural y política de primer orden.

A pesar de ello, los estudios académicos dedicados al tema son aún en general escasos, y los análisis de corte sociocrítico prácticamente nulos. Prima la investigación motivada por intereses económicos y tecnológicos concretos: muestreos de mercado, generación de nuevos modelos de negocio, ventajas e inconvenientes del marketing audiovisual, evaluaciones de la capacidad de la red, etc. Frente a esto, aspectos sociales, culturales y políticos como las posibilidades del vídeo en línea en procesos educativos, su valor en relación con procesos de activismo político o las formas en las que puede revitalizar el debate ciudadano en la esfera pública aparecen aún muy desdibujados y reclaman atención rigurosa.

Por un lado se ha señalado que las formas de interacción y reproducción social que articulan el contenido de portales como YouTube suponen en sí mismas un ejemplo de cultura participativa (Burgess y Green, 2009) en tanto permiten la coordinación de comunidades de interés en torno a prácticas expresivas plenamente integradas en los mundos de vida de sus miembros. En lo que respecta a su potencial participativo y de acción política, estas plataformas participativas permitirían visibilizar nuevos patrones de ciudadanía (Van Zoonen, Vis and Mihelj, 2010), destacando el rol que pueden jugar en campañas políticas (Thorson, Ekdale, Borah, Namkoong y Shah, 2010) o su uso frente a casos de acoso policial en manifestaciones y protestas  (Wilson y Serisier, 2010).

Otras lecturas enfatizan la necesidad de poner en relación esta cultura participativa con las complejas dinámicas de poder que estructuran los portales de video on-line más populares. Aquí se hace evidente la creciente comercialización de los espacios web relacionados con la difusión de vídeo (Kim, 2012) o los procesos de explotación comercial de la creatividad de los usuarios sobre la que se asienta el éxito de estos portales (Andrejevic, 2009). El valor participativo o de movilización política de estas plataformas aparecería más como una consecuencia imprevista que como uno de sus objetivos, lo que enfatiza la necesidad de evaluar las iniciativas de participación en las mismas desde una lógica definida de apropiación social (Sierra, 2013).

Se trata en cualquier caso de asociaciones que abren más preguntas de las que cierran: ¿se limita pues la participación a través del vídeo en línea a recrear una concepción más participativa de la cultura o hablamos de una práctica que tiene un impacto directo sobre la configuración de la esfera pública? ¿Qué nuevas formas de sociabilidad se generan sobre la base tecnológica de las distintas plataformas de vídeo on-line? ¿Cómo se estructura el conflicto entre intereses comerciales y participación ciudadana efectiva en el seno de las mismas? ¿Cuál es el poder transformador de las prácticas participativas en vídeo digital que albergan? ¿Qué patrones de apropiación social pueden observarse? ¿Está cambiando el vídeo on-line las formas tradicionales de protesta y activismo? ¿Permite realmente subvertir el papel de los ciudadanos frente al poder omnímodo de las corporaciones televisivas? ¿Influye en la articulación política de los espacios cotidianos?

El presente volumen tiene como intención comenzar a definir el andamiaje teórico que de paso a una discusión crítica sobre el impacto del vídeo on-line en prácticas de participación y acción política, contribuyendo a situar experiencias creativas basadas en la tecnología del video digital entre las formas de construcción de ciudadanía y desarrollo comunitario determinadas por el uso de las NTIC.  En este sentido, son de especial interés enfoques que aborden el fenómeno del vídeo on-line, en general, y el videoactivismo en particular, desde una perspectiva crítica.

Son bienvenidos artículos que aborden, entre otros temas, los siguientes:

•    Netactivismo y utilización del vídeo on-line por parte de movimientos sociales
•    Alfabetización digital y lenguaje audiovisual
•    Video on-line, vigilancia y control
•    Experiencias de transformación social que utilizan el vídeo on-line
•    YouTube y la economía política de la comunicación
•    Condicionantes corporativos de portales de vídeo: censura, comercialización, etc.
•    Sátira política, propaganda y viralidad en Internet (video memes)
•    Impacto de prácticas de vídeo on-line en la esfera pública
•    Visibilidad de las minorías
•    Nuevas formas de gestión de los derechos de autor
•    Formatos de vídeo en primera persona, entramados de vida y nuevas subjetividades (vlog)
•    Video digital y violación de derechos humanos (witness.org)
•    Experiencias participativas de base audiovisual puestas en marcha desde la administración pública
•    Co-creación e inteligencia colectiva frente a trabajo gratuito y explotación de los usuari@s

Los autores interesados pueden enviar sus propuestas (400-500 palabras) y un CV completo a la dirección de correo electrónico fsierra@us.es.

La fecha límite para la entrega de propuestas es el 27/01/2014.

La fecha de entrega de los artículos completos se negociará directamente con los autores seleccionados.

Contacto

Dr. Francisco Sierra Caballero
Profesor Titular / Grupo Interdisciplinario de Estudios en Comunicación, Política y Cambio Social (COMPOLITICAS)
Facultad de Comunicación (Universidad de Sevilla)
Avda. Américo Vespucio S/N (41092)
Sevilla / Spain
fsierra@us.es
Tel. +34 954559683

Referencias

ANDREJEVIC, M. (2009). “Exploiting YouTube: Contradictions of User-Generated Labor” en Snickars, P. y Vonderau P. (eds) The YouTube Reader. National Library of Sweden: Stockholm.

BURGESS, Jean y GREEN, Joshua (2009). Youtube. On-line Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Politi Press.

KIM, J. (2012). “The institutionalization of YouTube: From user generated content to professionally generated content”. Media Culture Society. Vol. 34. N. 1

SIERRA, F. (2013) Ciudadanía, Tecnología y Cultura. Nodos conceptuales para pensar la nueva mediación digital. Gedisa: Barcelona.

THORSONA, Kjerstin, EKDALEA, Brian, BORAHA, Porismita, NAMKOONG, Kang y SHAH Chirag (2010), “YouTube and Proposition 8. A case study in video activism” en Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 13, N. 3

VAN ZOONEN, Liesbet; VIS, Farida y MIHELJ, Sabrina (2010). “Performing citizenship on YouTube: activism, satire and on-line debate around the anti-Islam video Fitna” en Critical Discourse Studies, 7:4, 249-262

WILSON, Dean y SERISIER, Tanya (2010), “Video Activism and the ambiguities of counter-surveillance” en Surveillance & Society, Vol. 8, N. 2

Thinking Images. The Essay Film as a Dialogic Form in European Cinema

Título: Thinking Images. The Essay Film as a Dialogic Form in European Cinema.
Autor: David Montero.
Editorial: Peter Lang, Oxford 2013.

Leer más

Seminario Permanente “Cidade, Cultura Urbana e Cibercultura, agosto- dezembro de 2013, Universidade de Brasília

“Em parceria com o Grupo Interdisciplinario de Estudios en Comunicación, Política y Cambio Social e o Núcleo de Multimídia e Internet (NMI-UNB), o Programa de Pós-Graduação em Arte da Universidade de Brasília tem a honra de convidar para o SEMINÁRIO PERMANENTE “Cidade, Cultura Urbana e Cibercultura”, organizado pelo Prof. Dr Francisco Sierra Caballero (Professor visitante estrangeiro do PPGArte/UnB), pela Profª. Drª. Daniela Garrossini (PPGArte/UnB) e pela Profª. Drª. Fátima Santos (PPGArte/UnB).
O seminário será composto por encontros mensais, entre os meses de agosto a dezembro de 2013, com a realização de debates, palestras e trocas entre diversas áreas do conhecimento sobre as formas de articulação do pensamento e estudos urbanos sobre a mediação. Os encontros têm como objetivo debater, a partir do conhecimento crítico-reflexivo, os diversos problemas históricos, tecnológicos, cognitivos, ideológicos e culturais dos novos meios e mediações que ocupam lugar no atual processo de globalização e configuração da cidade com interface de análises dos problemas relativos à Cidadania, à Tecnologia e à Cultura.

Para mais informações sobre os encontros acesse:

http://www.cidadeculturaurbana.org/

Conferencia “Movimientos sociales y cultura digital: El ‪#‎15M‬ y ‪#‎yosoy132‬ como ejemplos de una nueva cultura global”. 20 agosto, Queretaro (México) [Streaming]

[Transmisión en Streaming (20 agosto a partir de las 9:00 AM hora de México) en la dirección: dsi.uaq.mx/video/canal6.html]

Conferencia con presentación del libro “Toma la calle, toma las redes. El movimiento #15M en internet” (2013, Atrapasueños). 

FECHA: Martes, 20 de agosto de 2013

HORA: de 10:00 a 13:00 horas

LUGAR: Auditorio de la Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales de la Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (México). Cerro de las Campanas s/n, Querétaro, Qro. C.P. 76100 (Ver mapa)

Evento en FB

RESUMEN DE LA CONFERENCIA:alt

En todo el mundo surgen nuevos movimientos sociales que se desvinculan de las tradiciones del movimiento obrero y de los nuevos movimientos sociales de los sesenta y setenta. “Novísimos movimientos sociales” o “nuevos movimientos globales” que, a pesar de surgir en contextos muy diferentes (15M en España, #yosoy132 en México, Occupy en el mundo anglosajón, la primavera árabe…), comparten discursos, estrategias y una nueva cultura global de movilización.

La globalización neoliberal, la crisis de legitimidad de las democracias autoritarias y la interconexión de los activistas a través de las TIC están creando una nueva cultura política global. Si mayo del 68 fue el punto de inflexión para la cultura de los nuevos movimientos sociales, el neozapatismo y el movimiento altermundista suponen el punto de partida para los novísimos movimientos contemporáneos. Una cultura que incide en establecer confluencias entre diversas luchas (“los rebeldes se buscan”) pero que valora a su vez la diversidad (“un mundo en el que quepan muchos mundos”). Nuevos movimientos que apuntan a un enemigo común (“el mal gobierno”, “por la humanidad y contra el neoliberalismo”) y que, aún sin un referente ideológico como los grandes relatos propios del movimiento obrero ni un programa cerrado de cambio social (“caminar preguntando”), reclaman una democracia radical (“el gobierno de los muchos”, “mandar obedeciendo”).

El 15M y #yosoy132 son dos ejemplos de estos movimientos hermanos que luchan por “radicalizar la democracia”, que reclaman una “democracia real ya” (15M), una “democracia autentica” (#yosoy132).


JOSE CANDÓN MENA es profesor investigador en la Facultad de Comunicación de la Universidad de Sevilla (España). Licenciado en Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas, Máster en Comunicación Política y Máster en Docencia e Investigación y Doctor en Ciencias de la Comunicación y Sociología por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

Investigador del Grupo Interdisciplinario de Estudios en Comunicación, Política y Cambio Social (COMPOLITICAS) y miembro del consejo de redacción de la Revista de Estudios para el Desarrollo Social de la Comunicación (Redes.Com).

Como activista es cofundador de Indymedia Estrecho y de Hack-Ándalus, colaborador del equipo de desarrollo de la red social Lorea/N-1, periodista en el sindicato CGT y participante en varios proyectos de comunicación alternativa y promoción del uso de las TIC en organizaciones sociales.

Su línea de investigación se centra en los movimientos sociales, la comunicación, las nuevas tecnologías y la democratización de los medios. Entre sus textos destacan su tesis doctoral “Internet en movimiento: Nuevos movimientos sociales y nuevos medios en la sociedad de la información” [http://eprints.ucm.es/12085], por la que obtuvo el Premio Extraordinario de Doctorado de la Universidad Complutense, y el libro “Toma la calle, toma las redes. El movimiento #15M en internet” (2013, Atrapasueños), por el que obtuvo el Premio de Investigación Social de Andalucía de la editorial Atrapasueños.

Actualmente realiza una estancia de investigación en México para estudiar el movimiento #yosoy132 sobre el que ya publicó el artículo “Movimientos por la democratización de la comunicación: Los casos del 15M y #yosoy132” (2013, Razón y Palabra) [http://razonypalabra.org.mx/N/N82/V82/32_Candon_V82.pdf].

Otros textos del autor pueden encontrarse en http://bookcamping.cc/somos/ozecai y en http://scholar.google.es/citations?user=AnhdNt0AAAAJ&hl=es&oi=ao


Introduce la conferencia el Dr. EMILIANO TRERÉ, Profesor Investigador de Movimientos Sociales y Medios Digitales de la Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales (UAQ), que actualmente estudia el movimiento #Yosoy132 y el Movimiento por la Paz con Justicia y Dignidad.

Sus publicaciones pueden encontrarse en: http://uaq.academia.edu/EmilianoTreré

Discute la obra ANTONIO CALLEJA LÓPEZ, Doctorando en Sociología (Exeter University, Inglaterra) y Filosofía (Universidad de Sevilla, España) y miembro de Datanalysis15M (grupo independiente de investigación tecnopolítica) http://datanalysis15m.wordpress.com/2013/06/20/lanzamiento-tecnopolitica-y-15m-la-potencia-de-las-multitudes-conectadas-el-sistema-red-15m-un-nuevo-paradigma-de-la-politica-distribuida/)